New Orleans Poetry Festival 2018 Schedule

Friday Night Registration and Opening Feature

Our Friday night opening will include a registration desk for new arrivals, opening remarks by the Directors, a reading by Louisiana Poet Laureate Jack Bedell, performances by members of the nationally recognized Baton Rouge Slam Team (Eskay, Jazmyne Smith, Alejandro, Kyle Beadle, Jolie Gilbert) and music from Kelcy Mae and Ever More Nest.  7-10 PM at Café Istanbul.

Date/Time
Location
Café Istanbul
Participants

Comedy Verses Poetry

No Good Poetry Podcast presents: Comedy Verses Poetry. What happens when we bring a bunch of comedians and poets together to close out 4/20? Come and see! Featuring: Briana Augustus, Bruins Bagneris, Joseph Bienvenu, Xander Bilyk, Chris Champagne, Nkechi Chibueze, JFunny, Adam Higgins, Chris Lane, Ted Orphan, Eritria Pitts, w/ Special Guests TBA!  Co-Hosted by Paul Oswell & J.S. Makkos.

 

Date/Time
Location
Mags, 940 Elysian Fields Ave.
Participants

Small Press Fair, Saturday

The Small Press Fair will be open for set-up at 8 AM, and open to the public 9 AM to 6 PM. Note that the area is not secure at night.

Date/Time
Location
Healing Center Lobby

Why Women's Workshop?

Why is a women’s workshop vital? How does community sustain the urgency of the writing process? It’s always difficult to maintain the writing habit, particularly in the absence of institutional structures and expectations, but we’ve found that women are particularly vulnerable to doubting the validity of their work--both in subject matter and in process. Women’s workshop addresses this need both by creating a community of trust and by making space for all phases and varieties of artistic process--even not writing. Our women’s collective is currently 6 poets working in radically different styles and forms. The space that we make together to talk about poetry is flexible to our individual and collective needs and wide enough to accommodate full length manuscripts--at any point--from the first spark to the last polishing touches before publication. Our engagement with each other’s work and ideas confirms and sustains our identities as serious writers even when as individuals we may not be producing work--or, not that we can see, yet.

Date/Time
Location
Classroom 250: 2nd Fl, 1st landing

Words of Revolution: The creation of a literary journal as social movement

After the 2016 election, educator Rosalyn Spencer and literary editor Kenyatta JP Garcia decided to found RIGOROUS, a new journal entirely edited and written by people of color. Rosalyn has spent her professional career hearing co-workers claim that the literature of people of color is less “rigorous” than white literature, and she and Kenyatta saw an immediate need to prove otherwise.

RIGOROUS released their first issue on Inauguration Day: January 20, 2017, after a mad scramble to conceive, design, and prepare a quality issue of a literary journal in this time frame. Its first year has been a wild and intense journey, one that they’d like to share with you.

Rosalyn Spencer and Kenyatta JP Garcia will talk about what it means to found a literary journal, to establish parameters of selection (both in terms of aesthetics, and in regard to marginalized people), and to create a lasting space for work. Associate Editor Carla Williams will talk about combining visual art with literature, and beautifying a text-based space. And Technical Director Jonathan Penton will talk about the best ways to present the idea of a journal in electronic space. The staff of RIGOROUS will then open the floor to questions.

Date/Time
Location
Rooftop: 4th Floor, Stairs or Elevator to 4th Floor

Dreams and Poetry Workshop

There are no symbols in dreams. The lion in your dreams is not a symbol of a lion--but a creature meant to inspire terror. My goal in working with dreams over the past 15 years is to strip the crust of interpretation and bring dreams back alive. 
We can do the same operation with poetry. Then instead of symbols, maybe we'll have lions again.
The potency of poetry is ruined by the flatness of explanation, the sterility of reactivity, and the curse of norms.  By looking at dreams closely,  we can restore our sense of the primacy of image and feeling in our poems. We can learn to revise our poems according to our dreams.
For this workshop, bring a fresh dream to discuss and a poem you are working on.  We will learn about the vertical and the horizontal in dreams and in poems, and read dream poems by  Alice Notley, Jean Valentine, David Shapiro.

10 AM - Noon
Limited to 15 participants.

Date/Time
Location
Classroom 250: 2nd Fl, 1st landing
Participants

Antenna/Press Street Press: The Sister Arts in the Modern Age

 For over ten years Antenna/Press Street Press in New Orleans has actively sought to create new collaborations across artistic disciplines, beginning with the 2006 writer/artist anthology Intersections and continuing today with its annual series of limited-edition inter-arts chapbooks. For this year’s NOPF, Antenna proposes a reading and discussion from the authors and artists of its 2016-2017 series, addressing both the opportunities and the challenges involved in creating such works. During this panel, the poets will both read from their works and discuss the process of collaborating with their respective artist partners, from concept to curation to execution, illustrating moments where the writing and art converged as
well as where they diverged, and highlighting successful aspects of the partnership that enabled the paired visions in these books to emerge. As a core component of Antenna’s mission is to catalyze new artwork in all disciplines, this panel aims to fertilize the ground for collaborations within our attendees, engaging projects and ideas from a range of locales and illuminating the rewards of these efforts. Ultimately, through showcasing the work of its most recent authors, this panel seeks to encourage, to stimulate, and to enliven this swiftly-growing field.

Date/Time
Location
Art Gallery: 2nd Fl, 1st Landing, Across from Classroom 250

Coastal Poetics: Crafting Erosion and Absence

When poets live on a coast, they’re constantly observing change. Like life itself, what is landscape one day may be gone the next, swept away by storms or rhipped away, quietly and unseen. In these times of climate sickness, how do poets craft work about what will always, in a way, become either the absence or a source of the absence? Should they eulogize the coast? Should their work risk joy? Or are they required to medicate poems and aim them, arrows of foreshadowing, toward the chronically ill future? In other words, is the role of poets who live on dying coasts to give witness? If so, how do their poems reconcile and reflect these dichotomies—observation of loss, memorializing what’s left—in both content and form? Panelists, all widely published who live on coasts, read their work and discuss how writing in unstable environments is like moving through the stages of grief, considering whether they even have the choice but to gird their poems’ architecture with the stilts of dread, anger, urgency and mourning.

Date/Time
Location
Rooftop: 4th Floor, Stairs or Elevator to 4th Floor

The Escape Is The Method: Black Fugitivity, The Outdoors, & (Re)Considering Elsewhere

“I could just always hear somebody running...I was closest to the runaway.” Poets Taylor Johnson, Sean D. Henry Smith, M’Bilia Meekers, A.H. Jerriod Avant, and Jayson P. Smith will read new poems in response to
the idea of “The Black Outdoors” (or, black fugitivity, as defined by Fred Moten and Saidiya Hartman). What does it mean to continue to produce art in the constant threat of state terror / violence? In an [American] project not built to hold our bodies / narratives / experiences, how do we gesture towards an elsewhere in our poetics? How do we create meaning from this kind of tension—these “terms and conditions" our living?

Date/Time
Location
Mezzanine: 2nd floor, top of lobby stairs, to right

Asian /American /Experiment

Within the Asian /American /Experiment, there is no single origin story, but messy, overlapping, fluctuating cultural histories and traditions. In this panel, Asian American scholars and poets will discuss alternative lineages of experimental writing and read new poems. How is the “American
experiment” reframed in the work of Asian American poets, when the category of “Asian American” encompasses various migration patterns, languages, and regional U.S. communities, as well as uncertain access to full citizenship and equality?  Given such flux, can we talk of an Asian American conceptual poeth/ic/nic?  What is innovation beyond assimilation?

Date/Time
Location
Rooftop: 4th Floor, Stairs or Elevator to 4th Floor

Black Radish Books: Thriving Nevertheless- new and forthcoming authors

A reading from new and forthcoming poets published by Black Radish Books. In Lisa Samuels’s Foreign Native, the poems are bodies walking out news, sound tracers, raw history in civic flesh, theaters of identity and talks in love. Poetry is a foreign native in our plans for language; it makes paradoxes of belonging if. Anastacia Renee, shattering the limits of lyric against churning seas of dissolution, asks what remains, how rise again? mónica teresa ortiz’s muted blood probes the intersection of policing and borders across bodies, sexualities, ethnicities, genders, asking what it might take to thrive. Responding to Spicer’s After Lorca, ortiz conjures “the skeleton of that tender-hearted crocodile,” Lorca’s ghost, to witness resistance, resilience, against violence and erasure. For her forthcoming The Beautiful, an anthology Initiated to counter the violence and turbulence currently at work in the U.S., Dana Teen Lomax asked a poet from each state of the US submit a “poem” (however conceptually they may interpret it—a news clipping, a piece of legislation, a photograph, etc.) that represents something BEAUTIFUL in that state. While Barbara Tomash’s PRE- reawakens her reader to the marvel of language, the common currency of encounter, media, negotiation, courtship. Collecting, collating, collaging the manifold threads spawned by the action of prefixes, the poet “[fixes] in the memory” language's capacity to wander, meanings folding outward and inward upon themselves, feral and profuse.

Date/Time
Location
Mezzanine: 2nd floor, top of lobby stairs

Poetry in the Archives: Documenting Louisiana Literature Then and Now

According to the KnowLouisiana digital encyclopedia, “Like Louisiana culture in general, Louisiana poetry is varied and multifaceted, reflecting the state’s mix of cultures and traditions.” The state’s notable literary history includes the first published anthology of poets of African descent and the longest continuously running poetry series in North
America. This rich heritage is documented in libraries and archives around the state. From collections of chapbooks and little magazines to the correspondence and manuscripts of poets and writers, poetry is alive and well in the archives. This panel includes librarians and archivists from Southern Louisiana who will discuss the literary and historical collections they preserve; how these collections are used by researchers, students, and poetry lovers; and how archives acquire literary collections.

Date/Time
Location
Cafe Istanbul: 1st Fl, rear

The Politicized Female Body and 21st Century Poetry

From the French ban on the burkini to continued efforts to defund Planned Parenthood to the current reckoning of high powered men guilty of sexual harassment and assault, women’s bodies are ideological and cultural battlefields as much as they have ever been. This panel will explore how four contemporary poets—Jesseca Cornelson, Erin Hoover, Kristin LaTour, and Jacqueline Allen Trimble—interrogate the politicized female body personally and socially within their poems. Collectively, their work tackles a range of issues including ability/disability, aging, motherhood/non-motherhood, race, reproductive issues, and sexuality. Each poet will present a brief statement about her poetics of the politicized female body and read a selection of relevant poems.

Date/Time
Location
Art Gallery: 2nd Fl, 1st Landing, Across from Classroom 250

Saturday Lunch Feature

Our Lunch Features include a free catered lunch with poetry performances in Café Istanbul. Readings will begin while we are still serving, so everyone is requested to help keep noise to a minimum. This is a 90 minute session, with readings beginning at 12:45.

Date/Time
Location
Café Istanbul

Journalism in Verse - The Poetics of

As natural disaster, protest, and political surrealism sweep the headlines, poets are gathering at the front lines to make investigations of their own. A new genre of poetics is emerging in the post-truth era, blending personal responses and journalistic technique. It’s what Elle Aviv Newton, cofounder of Poets Reading the News, calls journalism in verse. Join her as she moderates a panel with poet-journalists to talk about poetry’s increased relevance in the current news climate, both politically and environmentally. From El Paso, Abigail Carl-Klassen’s fierce poetic output explores conservative politics and the plight of undocumented civilians, often sourcing legislative records and soundbites. Texan J. Todd Hawkins’ poetry reports on increasingly common natural disasters, blending lyricized fiction with factual accounts. What is journalism in verse, and who is it for? How is poetry being used to document, process, and communicate events at local and national levels? How can poetry help communities heal in the wake of trauma, and activate in the face of injustice? This is a dynamic and urgent conversation that will leave no question as to why poetry is among our era’s most essential art forms.

Date/Time
Location
Mezzanine: 2nd floor, top of lobby stairs, to right

Lavender Ink / Diálogos Reading

This event will feature readings by poets, writers and translators from Lavender Ink and Diálogos Books. Lavender Ink was founded in 1995 in New Orleans by Bill Lavender, who is still the Director and Editor in Chief. The Press is a sole-proprietorship, not a 501-C3 nor any other type of corporation, and is funded solely by revenues from book sales and some small grants and funding initiatives for individual books. Prior to 2012 the press published only poetry, but is now publishing fiction, nonfiction and other genres, also. Diálogos is an imprint of Lavender Ink devoted to literatures which have cross-cultural significance, primarily but not exclusively literature in translation. It is envisioned, too, that such work will often have a political component.

Date/Time
Location
Café Istanbul

The Queen of Wands: Queer Sex Magic & Poetics

The Queen of Wands, the most sexual of all queens
her and her black cat

--- Kristen Nelson, the length of this gap
Language’s guts are composed, in part, of flux. The way it moves, swerves across the surfaces, broadcasts the signals of our interior nuances, remembers, forgets, remembers, fucks, seethes, and so on: the ever-shifting vibration inside the trespass that is the letter forming the body and/or its absence. To want something more than the false mastery categorization promises (which is the dream of capitalism). Something more erotic. More of eros (from eran, rooting in erasthai, which, fittingly, is of uncertain origin): to write as mystics and diviners about the erotics of the body (of love, of text). Please join these writers to hear their meditations/performances/confessions/readings of queer sex magic and poetics, as they engage with the topic.

Date/Time
Location
Rooftop: 4th Floor, Stairs or Elevator to 4th Floor

Unlikely Stories: A 20th Anniversary Reading

On July 1, 1998, UNLIKELY STORIES debuted as an on-line journal of transgressive poetry. In the past twenty years, it has been home to some of the most remarkable voices in experimental and neo-pulp literature, and has expanded its mission to visual art, movies, music, fiction and creative non-fiction, sociopolitical conversations, and criticism of all types. It has spawned a daughter company, UNLIKELY BOOKS, featuring full-length and chapbooks of poetry and fiction, has undergone decades of changes and redesigns, and is currently titled UNLIKELY STORIES MARK V. This reading will demonstrate the diverse talents of some of UNLIKELY’s most extraordinary contributors. Larissa Shmailo, NYC stalwart, will read in her engaging, syncopated style. Marc Vincenz will compare the political, the personal, and the passionate. And Vincent A. Cellucci and Christopher Shipman will demonstrate their poems through dialogue and dialogue through poems. Poets will be introduced by UNLIKELY’s Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Penton.

Date/Time
Location
Spotted Cat

Writing the Persona Poem

In the post-Confessionalist era, it is easy for readers to assume that the narrative “I” in a poem is intended to be a variant of the author. However, persona poems work explicitly to blur that line or to eschew the idea all together. This panel will focus on ways to use a variety of voices within your work in order to construct a narrative in verse, either in chapbook or full-length form. Participants will discuss how to choose a particular persona, the research that goes into writing persona poetry, as well as how to successfully inhabit a voice outside of one's own. Each participant will also speak briefly on their own experience with constructing a variety of personas (from historical speakers to invented characters) as well as how they used these characters to build a manuscript based on or around these voices.
 

Date/Time
Location
Art Gallery: 2nd Fl, 1st Landing, Across from Classroom 250f

Visual Poetry Workshop

A two-hour workshop with hands-on production of visual poetry. Includes a 10-15 minute presentation along with a packet/workbook containing exemplars of visual poetry as well as background, prompts, and other resources. The workshop will feature a series of exercises not unlike the experience of attending a figure drawing class. The work done by students will result in a series of drafts and at least one visual poem by the end of the workshop.
Tools provided will include: typewriters, stencils, carbon transfers, letterset (rub off letters), stamps, pen & ink, other writing instruments, such as pens, pencils, markers, (some) paints, along with opaque or overhead projectors for tracing, and magnification, etc. We will also encourage students to capture their work and the progression of their pieces through digital documentation, to further the potential audience. 

2 Hours, led by Joseph Makkos, Joseph Bienvenu, and special guests.

Date/Time
Location
Classroom 250: 2nd Fl, 1st landing
Participants

Hyacinth Girl Press Reading

A poetry reading featuring poets from Hyacinth Girl Press - http://hyacinthgirlpress.com/
 

Date/Time
Location
Art Gallery: 2nd Fl, 1st Landing, Across from Classroom 250

Otherness/Self/Migration in 21st Century Poetic Practice

What is it to be international in spirit? Or a poet-citizen of a single country? We live in constant interconnectedness with people, images, news and environmental changes from across the globe. So what is the real geolocation of a poetry and poetics of place and self? Three poets from different parts of the American continent will address this question: Jennifer K Dick from Iowa, USA, residing in Mulhouse, France—a border town with Germany and Switzerland—Lisa Pasold from Montréal, Canada, residing currently in Paris, France, and Diana Shortez born in Austin, TX and residing in New Orleans. In this panel, they will address how their own work, and that of the poets they are reading, is not of or about place but which inherently in its explorative narratives and practices interrogates place/self and otherness. This position demands linguistic strangeness, from single words, sound / lyric elements to entire passages in languages that are not English, even when creating for an American audience. How do we write out of unrootedness?

Date/Time
Location
Rooftop: 4th Floor, Stairs or Elevator to 4th Floor

Poetry & Visual Innovation: The Page as Score for Performance

An exploration of visual and performance innovations in poetry. Discussion and examples: ranging from Stephen Vincent’s haptics (often without words), to Hank Lazer’s shape-writing, to the range of work in the The Last Vispo Anthology (co-edited by Crag Hill), to the fusion of Chinese & English in the work of Jonathan Stalling, to the videos of Jane Cassidy.  The panel presentation will show (through projection and through a possible installation) a range of examples leading to a conversation about the changing nature of poetry, the page, and the book, as well as exploring (and performing) how the poem and the page become multi-directional scores and prompts for a range of displays and performances.

Hank Lazer, Stephen Vincent, Jonathan Stalling, Crag Hill, Jane Cassidy

Date/Time
Location
Café Istanbul

Small Press Reading 1

Small Press reading featuring Valerie Wallace, Su Zi, Jen Karenick, Jade Quinn

Date/Time
Location
Mezzanine: 2nd floor, top of lobby stairs

Underworlds--A Reading

This reading brings together poets from our 2018 NOPF community to read their poems beneath sea level of the underdom, the unmarketable, the underneath, the rhizomatic, the subterranean, and the invisible--i.e. the underworldly. The reading will feature poems of, informed by, divining, making space for, reimagining, recreating the underworld. 

Date/Time
Location
Spotted Cat 1st Fl

Dillard University English Club Presents Spoken Word

Dillard’s English Club is a group of young writers, urging to craft their works and experiment with the potential to become someone, who have a purpose and desire fulfill their aspirations. We represent the youth. Dillard students Des’Trell Banks, Amara Edwards and Aubrey Smith will be joined by poet Quess Moore for the presentation. 

 

 

Date/Time
Location
Spotted Cat

Into the Macular Hole: The Future of Gurlesque Poetics

 In November 2002, Arielle Greenberg discerned the emergence of anew aesthetic mode she called “The Gurlesque.” Young women, poet-descendants of Stevie Nicks & 90s-era riot grrrls, were drawing from literary traditions like camp, kitsch, burlesque, and the grotesque to create a new kind of radical poetics. With a roster of extraordinary writers like Catherine Wagner, Chelsey Minnis, & Brenda Shaughnessy, Greenberg describes a Gurlesque poetics as one in which “words luxuriate: they roll around in the sensual while avoiding the sharpness of overt messages, preferring the curve of sly mockery to theory or revelation.” Gurlesque poems “are thoroughly enmeshed in the visceral experiences of gender,” always reminding us that identity is a performance. These converging attitudes have manifested in work that oozes, bleeds, swells, shits, decays, fucks. Poetry unafraid of kitsch, camp, or gore. Poems insistent on pleasure. Fifteen years later, the landscape of contemporary poetry is brimming with young writers who cut their teeth on such work; in this panel, we want to question what it means to be daughters of the Gurlesque, descendants of this particular poetic lineage. Through critical & creative inquiry, we’ll consider what a Gurlesque future could & should look like, engaging with questions of identity, sexuality, radicalism, & political responsibility. How might we demand pleasure in an increasingly troublesome world? As our systems of power & governance become increasingly grotesque themselves, is a Gurlesque aesthetic still relevant? Substantive? We hope to expose & envision the afterlives of the Gurlesque – taking stock of where we’ve arrived now, and imagining where we could still go, together.

Date/Time
Location
Rooftop: 4th Floor, Stairs or Elevator to 4th Floor

Line by Line: An Interactive Reading

LINE BY LINE, an interactive reading hosted by Red Rover Series, is a reading that will involve any poets at the festival who wish to participate. Poets will determine their own entrance and exit points multiple times during the event in order to read their poems with and to each other, using each line of their poem to create new, collaborative poems with the other participants. We will make careful choices about how to be together and communicate, and how to make, take and share space.

Date/Time
Location
Café Istanbul

Mixed Race/Mixed Genre: the traditions of multiracial writing

According to the 2010 Census the population reporting multipleraces (9.0 million) grew by 32.0 percent. Three of the presenters are of mixed race. As as whole panel, we want to focus on the those mixed writers who came before us as well as those who are currently at work. We will be discussing the writing of "mulatto," mestizo and trigueno poets with our focus being on
how they have broken boundaries and blended forms/genres.
We will look at writers such as Jean Toomer and Gloria Anzaldua as they are almost synonymous with hybrid writing but we will also look as far back as Alexander Pushkin and as forward as modern day hip-hop and multimedia artists. With the exception of Pushkin, our focus will be mostly on African-American and Afro-Latinx writers of mixed descent as that is what we
are and those are the traditions that we carry on as poets.
Some of those traditions that we carry forward in addition to the stylistic desire to break away from poetic forms and to include poetry in novels or criticism along with stanzas is to add magical, surrealistic, and sci-fi elements as well as AAVE, patois and Spanglish. We will be discussing not
only literary techniques and but also linguistic choices and  various (pop) cultural approaches to poetry. Afrofuturism and magical realism are well within the range of our writers but as is the case with most mixed-race writing, we tend to push the limits and erase boundaries. One presenter will
specifically speak to "mixed magic." Another will discuss the role and use of post/post-post modernism in multiracial writing. Throughout the panel, there will be talk about displacement and the diaspora.
We have also included a non-mixed writer who is in a mixed-race relationship to share her ideas as on this topic as she may well be starting a mixed race family. As a Asian woman with a Latino partner, we feel that her perspective on Afro-Latinx writing is well-informed not only academically but on a personal level and should provide some insights which we believe will be of interest to the audience and other panelists. We are at a point in American writing where discussions need to be had about race and this will provide a much needed inter-racial one.
It is our hope that in examining the work of multiracial writers that we will also be exploring the cultural context and politics within their/our poetics that is very necessary today as our world is on one hand becoming more mixed and yet on the other is being torn apart by the rise of the alt-right. Poetry has power.



        List of Participants

          Jennifer Maritza McCauley, Laurin DeChae, Amanda Huynh

Date/Time
Location
Art Gallery: 2nd Fl, 1st Landing, Across from Classroom 250

Small Press Reading II

Featuring Cate Root, Cait Weiss Orcutt, Jeff Grieneisen, Travis Cebula

Date/Time
Location
Mezzanine: 2nd floor, top of lobby stairs

Dusie Presents

Dusie Press and friends share new work.
D U S I E  began as an online innovative poetics journal in 2005. The press started publishing full-length works in paperback soon after under a kollektiv bent ever since. Setting out to enhance poetic risk-taking and experimentation DUSIE was one of the first to publish e-chaps, especially in great numbers. DUSIE continues to support contemporary emerging poets alongside those more established from around the world. Poetry writing with book-art visions foster both community and synergy as well in its satellite projects, collective chapbooks and thematic issues with changing guest editors, making poetry available to a wider audience through free online PDF downloads at www.dusie.org.

Date/Time
Location
Mezzanine

Everyday Muses: Poetry Show & Tell

This multi-media reading will feature five poets who will present their work along with artifacts of inspiration. Stretching the boundaries of traditional ekphrasis--writing after art--these poets’ influences expand beyond the familiar, including but not limited to music, food, flora, and place. These poets demonstrate how an artifact like a homemade shadowbox, an aria, a found text, a basketball, a street map, or a recipe could each be a catalyst for a poem. Reading in a round, these poets will informally discuss the specific artifacts that influenced the poems at hand and speak briefly to their individual processes of writing.

Date/Time
Location
Spotted Cat

Forms of Attention

We’re in a moment as a species of unprecedented speed and strategy.
It’s a numbers-driven time, cut loose from both flesh and spirit (and the voices that live between)—an anesthetic mode of mind required for the brutalities of colonial world-making. Taking poetics as world-making, and aesthetics as a way to wake up, these Singing Horse authors approach their work as a contemplative space for refining deeper listening to voices within and without. Against the grain of our current cultural training, this space is more receptive than acquisitive, open to coincidence and change. Given this orientation, in addition to sharing brief process notes on the poems we will read from our books, we will weave in a brief activity designed for audience members to take part, offering an enlivening “many beaded” reading fitting the host city.

Date/Time
Location
Rooftop: 4th Floor, Stairs or Elevator to 4th Floor

Lonely Voices: Storytelling, Character, and Place

In his classic study of the short story, The Lonely Voice, Frank O’Connor writes that the best short fiction doesn’t have heroes. Instead, it speaks for members of “submerged population groups.” “His uncommon broad accent was a great source of jest to me, I being from the town as you may recognize,” says IRA footman Bonaparte, the narrator of O’Connor’s great anti-war story, “Guests of the Nation.” Though it’s perhaps dangerous to extrapolate from short stories to novels, we could say that all fiction is “voiced,” which is to say, rendered as if told by a story-consciousness speaking to us from somewhere beyond where we are in time and space.
In very different ways, voice is central to the fiction of the four writers on this panel, which will ask them to consider the role of voice in their work. How central is voice to the composition of fiction? In particular, what is the relationship between voice and place? Returning to O’Connor’s idea of “submerged population groups,” how does voice allow a writer, a character, an authorial- or story-consciousness to testify to the experience of people outside the mainstream, or to speak in ways that can change our understanding of history, or of our place in the world?

Date/Time
Location
Classroom 250: 2nd Fl, 1st landing

Trembling Pillow Press Reading

NOPF co-sponsor Trembling Pillow Press presents readings by new and recent authors, moderated by Megan Burns.

Date/Time
Location
Café Istanbul

Saturday Night Feature

Join us Saturday night at Siberia for our main features plus some late night music (Poets with Bands.) The show begins at 7 PM and threatens to extend into the wee hours. 

Date/Time
Location
Siberia Lounge, 2227 St Claude Ave, New Orleans, LA 70117

Conjuring the Body: Praxis and Somatic Poiesis

How does one enter the threshold between the lived body and its experience of gesticulation? This panel seeks to interrogate methods of rapture and rupture through somatic gesture and poetic praxis to engage the ways in which what is conjured leaves a mark upon body and page—a crossing over and between practices of divination through Hoodoo, the erotic, bodywork, writing and prayer.

Date/Time
Location
Classroom 250: 2nd Fl, 1st landing

Counter-Desecration: A Glossary for Writing in the Anthropocene—presentations and readings

Counter-Desecration: A Glossary for Writing Within the Anthropocene, forthcoming from Wesleyan university Press, 2018, is a collaborative glossary responding to the need to critically and creatively inhabit our new political and ecological realities. The contributors’ words – common terms, repurposed words, and neologisms – map new perspectives that together provide ways to approach the interlinked social, economic, and environmental forces that shape us, the places we live, and our relationship to them, to each other, and to other species. The glossary collects terms and definitions written by international, contemporary poets, presenting a set of tools to create alternative ways of knowing. Contributors to Counter-Desecration will address their contribution(s) to the glossary and read work arising from or in response to that term(s).

Date/Time
Location
Rooftop: 4th Floor, Stairs or Elevator to 4th Floor

Coven/Bloof Reading

Hosted by Coven Press Editor Jessica Smith, the Coven/Bloof Reading will feature poets associated with both presses. 2 hours / 9-11.

Date/Time
Location
Mezzanine: 2nd floor, top of lobby stairs

Mobile Idea Lab

St. Martin’s Episcopal School offers NOPF 2018 a New Approach to Writing Workshops!  Upper School creative writing students at St. Martin’s Episcopal School will join the lineup at the New Orleans Poetry Festival 2018 by showcasing their generative talents with the school’s Mobile Idea Lab, a unique state of the art vehicle that takes the Gibbs Family Center for Innovation + Design at St. Martin’s to the streets! This Innovation + Design studio on wheels will be transformed into a literary salon as students use the truck’s tools to offer poetry fest attendees a creative menu of quick writing prompts and generative exercises. The truck will be stationed in the parking lot behind the Healing Center from 9 AM to 5PM. Anyone interested need to bring nothing other than an openness to weirding out with words. Come out and make some art!   

  

Date/Time
Location
Healing Center Parking Lot, Rear of Building

Small Press Fair, Sunday

The Small Press Fair will be open for set-up at 8 AM, and open to the public 9 AM to 6 PM. Breakdown at 6 PM.

Date/Time
Location
Healing Center Lobby

Pilipinx/Filipinx Poetics: Language for Resistance, Renewal &Magik

What does it mean to refuse, to not be limited by the binaries of personal, gender and/or geographic borders? If we say gender is fluid, then what is the materiality or the citizenry of a diasporic body or queer Pilipinx/Filipinx diasporic body if not fluid-like? The synthesis is fluent and transnational. An amalgamation that chooses and embraces nonconformity (whether it be gender, sexual orientation, citizenship or cultural heritage etc.) and yet the Pilipinx/Filipinx diasporic body and narrative continues to be adaptable and resilient.
In Kay Ulanday Barrett’s curated interview on queer Pilipinx/Filipinx poetics (Lambda Literary Review), Jade Phoenix describes her relationship to the identifying term, Pilipinx as “I feel that it is a unique signifier to my lived experience as a queer first generation Filipina/o/x and a way of connecting my work and poetry to others out there in the diaspora…”
Kimberly Alidio follows up with, “Filipinx, yes, with nods to Latinx communities and gender non-conforming and non-binary folks everywhere…My poetics and politics are many named. None of the names describe. Instead: language materializing with bodies, histories, technology and dreams.”
As such, these poets confront and disrobe the histories of colonization and the oppressive systems designed to erase queer and multi-ethnic Pilipinx/Filipinx narratives and imaginaries. And in this subversive process, these poets continue to fuel a tradition of poetry of resistance as well as create a language of self-renewal within the hybrid topography of the body and the transcultural landscape, creating a new assemblage from what has been ravished or stolen⎯conjurers of new politik, folklore and magik.
This reading (with a brief Q&A) will showcase works by and about queer and trans Pilipinx/Filipinx poets as well as Pilipinx/Filipinx poets that identify as first generation and 1.5 generation immigrant and come from multiracial or mixed heritage background.
List of Participants

          Kimberly Alidio, Hari Alluri, Jade Phoenix Martinez, Kay Ulanday
Barrett and Angela Penaredondo
 

Date/Time
Location
Art Gallery: 2nd Fl, 1st Landing, Across from Classroom 250

Slimy "I": Lyric Affinities in the End Times

Moss Angel writes in their poem “Trans Memoir 8”: “care is a desired ending, but one that cannot be obtained without an intense, even violent period of restructuring.” This panel will explore how we can restructure the lyric “I” through a queer ecological lens in order to care for ourselves in-and-with the world, in-and-with the elements that form us—mutual and mutable bodies—resisting annihilation and loss. “I” is neither a discrete entity nor a fixed essence. “I” is a horizon, a slimy threshold—a membranous flow of energies and affinities, of all material and virtual elements enveloping and regenerating in infinite inter-embodiment. How might this "I" look? Feel? Speak? Panelists will read from their current works as well as discuss their writing processes and poetics, followed by a short open discussion. A zine containing prompts will be offered to audience members.
 

Date/Time
Location
Classroom 250: 2nd Fl, 1st landing

That Various Field: A generative, outdoors-based experience and reflection through poetry comics

 —At the beginning of the workshop, to allow for late arrivals,
we'll read [enclosed]
-James Schuyler’s “Salute”
-Eileen Myles’s “Writing”
-Ross Gay’s “A Small Needful Fact”
—We’ll then walk around the campus and the town as long as time allows.
—On walk, we'll try not to talk (i.e. CAConrad: “quietly shoo them away, you’re busy, you’re a poet”).
—Provide gloves and bags and instruct: if you see some trash, pick it up. Take photos if you’d like.
—We’ll stop periodically to sip some water and jot down notes of things we’ve seen, heard, thought, and wait for those of different speeds.
—Back in the classroom, we'll write a poem if low on time.
—If high on time, I'll pass out index cards, 8 per person.
-On four we’ll draw: things we saw, were reminded of, etc.
-On the other four we'll write: things we heard, were reminded of, thought, etc.
—Either together or back at home, depending on time, we'll play with the cards, rearranging the text as captions under the images. Fun unexpected juxtapositions will occur.
—Now you have a comics page.
-You can ink the lines you want to keep.
-Try finding one area in each image to fill in with ink.
—Now you also have an experience to explore in a poem.
—Now you also have an experience you've explored in various forms, so you can think about
-What you liked about each form
-What was challenging
-When to repeat the practice (hopefully)

Date/Time
Location
Outside Café Istanbul, first floor rear
Participants

Why Poets Love & Need Independent Presses

New and recent poets with Factory Hollow Press read and talk some about the importance of publishing with independent small presses, and talk, too, about starting and maintaining an independent press.

Date/Time
Location
Rooftop: 4th Floor, Stairs or Elevator to 4

Bone, Memory, Muscle, Joint: The Embodied Poetics of Walking

Walking is a special kind of daydreaming. Its locomotions drive the writer’s imagination much like Rube Goldberg’s elaborate cartoon gadgets perform merely simple tasks. At the same time, walking is of the body—a multiplicity of simultaneous negotiations experienced in bone, memory, muscle, and joint. We consider walking for the writer an act of disciplined improvisation and repetitive motion—it is both ripe for encounter and at times, an unevent: an utterly banal pursuit. Our panel proposes to examine the different aspects and possibilities walking and movement afford the writer. It will explore walking as a way of crossing thresholds, moving outward, gathering up, and processing; as a means of edging past boundaries, frontiers, fringes; as embodied research and a deeply immersive translation; and as an act of destabilization. In this traversing, the poet-perambulator can be a type of medium reading the terrain and its communities, or conversely, a person experiencing the walk in a way that is passive, reflexive, hollowing out. How can walking, then, realign and focus the various faculties, capacities, even planes of being in such a way that it becomes a kind of para-living, simultaneously trance (an “out-of-body” experience) and a traveling through the self? At the intersection of mind and body is the roaming writer, engaged in a practice of drifting and riffing that re-evaluates what mind is and can be. We seek to encourage and engage writers in approaches that explore these fertile territories of peregrination.

Date/Time
Location
Classroom 250: 2nd Fl, 1st landing

Experiments in Intimacy: Visual Poetics of Femme Friendship

Our panel comprises a network of women who write and teach visual poetry. Our decades-long conversations have generated poems, collaborative essays and other friendships with women in the field, which in turn have generated their own creative work. As Jessica Smith writes in her introduction to “Women in Visual Poetry; The Bechdel Test” (Essay Press 2015) “The homosocial has long been celebrated in poetry, but it is usually male... Here, in the public space of these documented conversations, we can see women openly taking up space together, talking to each other, loving each other, and creating with each other on a daily basis.” This panel will reflect on the implications of making (and making space for) generically confusing and in-between visual poems through historically uncelebrated and uncharted conversations between women. As our roles shift from friend to educator to collaborator and back again, we will exchange ideas about how to bring Visual Poetry to a new generation of young women, including collaborative lesson plans that have worked in the classroom and poetry reading settings.

Date/Time
Location
Mezzanine: 2nd floor, top of lobby stairs

Vale la Pena: Writing in the Borderlands

As poets growing and writing on the Texas-Mexico border, we have found ourselves coping with and struggling to understand the hate speech and violence happening throughout our country and its impact on our home. Resistance in our area is, in many cases, led by artists, and as poets, we have each worked to use our voices to push for awareness, tolerance, and change. The Rio Grande Valley is unlike any other area in that it exists between borders—between checkpoints and walls—in what Gloria Anzaldúa, a Valley writer and scholar, described as an herida abeirta or an open wound where the population is mostly Mexican American and the poverty rate heartbreaking. As one of the few progressive areas in Texas, we use writing to fight against injustices on our frontera. Writing allows us to be on the right side of history, to do work that matters, and to protect our home. In this panel, poets from the RGV, specifically the Chocholichex Collective, will read from creative works and discuss borderland issues and their impact on writing and community.

Date/Time
Location
Art Gallery: 2nd Fl, 1st Landing

Sunday Lunch Feature

Our Lunch Features include a free catered lunch with poetry performances in Café Istanbul. Readings will begin while we are still serving, so everyone is requested to help keep noise to a minimum. This is a 90 minute session, with readings beginning at 12:45.

Date/Time
Location
Café Istanbul

Workshop: Freak Lips: Writing the Unsaid

(2 hours) Most writers sit around talking about what they have alreadywritten and what they’re currently writing. This poetry workshop explores the sentences that live fully formed within us but cannot be said or written. We will confront our own unsaid sentences. We will sort through the frothy membranes of their words, which have created or refracted variations of selves through internalization, that in the act of unspeaking, of withholding, have until now, baffled and altered us. Investigating the distinction between secrecy and privacy, this workshop is about the risk and precipice of writing through the unsaid. Conversations and exercises will generate both a safe space to examine the complexity of emotional self-censorship and serve as a catalyst for activating linguistic agency. We will unleash our unsaid sentences and treat them with ferocious tenderness. You will be changed. We will be changed together.

Date/Time
Location
Classroom 250: 2nd Fl, 1st landing

Collabs, Collectives, and Communities

Strategies for sharing resources and growing audience within a framework of co-operation. Panel participants will examine aspects of publishing, performing, bookings, sales, cross-promoting, and social platforms that model self-activism as an extension of community building.

Date/Time
Location
Art Gallery: 2nd Fl, 1st Landing

Creatures of Becoming

This reading will feature four poets who will read their ruminations about the organic metamorphosis within life-worlds, exploring the ambiguity within ourselves and the world by navigating realms of animal, plant, human and non-human. Like a ritual, the poets will guide you through thresholds and rites of passage, ultimately stitching together and healing the transformational rift.
This reading represents a boundless menagerie of creatures all in the throes of becoming. This reading travels through and subverts boundaries, roaming in the liminal area between chaos and order, psyche and body, human and non-human, between the wilderness and civilization of language. This reading illustrates humanity’s ethically challenged relation to other living things. Poets will provoke chimeras of questions and uncertainties through ruptures and rapture. This reading, slouching toward wonder, aspires to germinate a different kind of sensitivity to the world.

Date/Time
Location
Mezzanine: 2nd floor, top of lobby stairs

Infrarealism and Alternative Community

The young poets who came together in mid-1970s Mexico City to found Infrarealism were keenly aware that the artistic and political freedoms promised by the historical avant-garde had been betrayed. What was left was an ossified, institutionalized literary vanguard whose dominion was jealously guarded by a small circle of cultural elites. The Infras were united by their collective and individual determination to subvert the forces that imposed this regime and conspired to maintain it. And while these acts of subversion would take many forms over the next two decades, at the heart of them all was a commitment to integrating art and life by means of what Roberto Bolaño called "an ethics-aesthetics carried to the end." Featuring talks and readings by Infrarealist co-founder Rubén Medina, translators John Burns and Cole Heinowitz, and poet Matt Longabucco, this panel will explore the radical politics and aesthetics of Infrarealism and their continued urgency for contemporary poetic practice in America.

Date/Time
Location
Café Istanbul

Sundress Publications Reading

A poetry reading by Sundress Publications authors moderated by Erin Elizabeth Smith.

Date/Time
Location
Spotted Cat

A Poet in New York (again)

Ten years ago, in 2008, Grove Press published Pablo Medina and Mark Statman’s translation of Federico García Lorca’s Poet in New York, which John Ashbery called “the definitive version of Lorca’s masterpiece, in language that is as alive and molten today as was the original in 1930.” To mark the decade since its appearance, Statman will revisit their translation, talking about and reading from this essential book of modern poetry. Moderated by Bill Lavender.

Date/Time
Location
Rooftop: 4th Floor, Stairs or Elevator to 4th Floor

Black Space: A Reading with Black Poets

Dr. Erna Brodber, recent winner of the Windham-Campbell Prize, created Black Space in Jamaica as a way to center the ways of knowing and being of Black Jamaicans, a "place where we could talk to each other and find out for ourselves about each other," a "private space where we could talk our truths," as she says in a 2013 interview with Afifa Aza. Building on Dr. Brodber's theory and healing space, this reading will be centered in the poetics of Black Space. We'll be talking to each other, about each other, for each other.  We'll be doing this fully aware we're in New Orleans, in a city whose Black Spaces have been/are under continual threat by cishetero patriarchal White Supremacist systems that devalue Black life at the same time these systems seek to commodify it. This reading and these poets also acknowledge that Black Spaces in the settler colonial nation state known as the United States always exist on Indigenous lands.
Kalamu ya Salaam, Ashley Jones,Tony Medina, Rae Paris

Date/Time
Location
Caré Istanbul

C&R Press Presents

C&R Press presents a selection of their latest books of poetry that illustrate a range of approach, voice and orientation with poets Earl Braggs (Negro Side of the Moon), Kristina Marie Darling (Dark Horse), Ariel Francisco (All My Heroes are Broke) and Christian Anton Gerard (Holdfast).

Date/Time
Location
Mezzanine: 2nd floor, top of lobby stairs

Creation and Translation: A Panel of Translator-Poets

This panel of three translator-poets will explore from the inside poetic translation compared to original composition. How does one’s experience as a poet inform one’s translations? How does one’s experience as a translator inform one’s poetry? In translating, which takes precedence, sound or sense? What specific challenges do the languages of Bulgarian, Serbian, and Japanese pose for the translator of poetry? What role does culture play? Is anything truly untranslatable? The audience will be invited to ask further questions for what should be a lively and insightful discussion.

Date/Time
Location
Art Gallery: 2nd Fl, 1st Landing

Small Press Reading III

Featuring Cassie Pruyn, Lisa Pasold, Chris Cheek, Dana Teen Lomax

Date/Time
Location
Spotted Cat

Small Press Reading IV

Featuring Ben Aleshire, Paris Hughes Tate, Jeffrey Wright, Jill Darling

Date/Time
Location
Spotted Cat